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Use of encryption: Privacy Vs National Security

Citizens’ privacy and national security are at odds since the foundation. If any illusions remain concerning however way the govt can move to collect info in the name of national security, it ought to be noted clearly that just every online communication is subject to discovery.

There are secret and intimate conversations with your co-workers and family along with your family details. There are business secrets and you must have the power to shield it.

Data encryption has come to the forefront as a vital technique of security. A lot has been written and aforesaid regarding cyber war, fraud, and also the invasion of privacy in current news reports and articles, and definitely, these issues create serious threats to our society and to our privacy. According to a recent poll by the Information Technology Association of America, seventy-five percent of the people surveyed declared that they feared to have their personal data exploited. Additionally, according to the government and the privacy advocacy groups, 7,00,000 cases of fraud were rumored in recent, the credit card trade sustained billions of bucks in losses attributable to credit card fraud in last decade.

I pause to ask if these are matters of national security or privacy? The answer is NILL because there is an incredibly delicate balance between security and privacy.

In 2015, it was revealed that the terrorists who attacked Paris communicated via an encrypted app and because of which that unfortunate sin couldn’t be prevented. The security of our online banking, communication and important infrastructure is heavily dependent on encryption to stay us safe. At the same time, these measures of protection additionally create problems for enforcement agencies to observe suspects.

There are merely no right and wrong answers to the present hot topic, solely human opinion. The one sure thing is that authorities and tech firms that manage our communication tools have totally different ideas of what’s the correct course of action.

The founder of WhatsApp experienced primary the consequences of suppression of free speech and infringement of privacy. The WhatsApp founder is seemingly inspired to implement a positive amendment and right a number of wrongs for all the right reasons. However, can this be enough to convert the cynical mobs online?

Everyone agrees that the present security race is serving neither national security nor individual digital privacy protection well. Any alternative not carefully thought-about and enacted could be considerably worse. Therefore before any resolution is enforced, the chief concerns of each enforcement and privacy advocates must be respectfully acknowledged and addressed.

Unsurprisingly, digital privacy advocates are skeptical for a number of reasons one of which is cybersecurity. And the only way we know how to secure is to encrypt it. End-to-end encryption has a place. Cybersecurity is actually vital and getting it wrong costs the economy and costs individuals money as well, therefore I support end-to-end encryption.

 

 

-Kshitij Roshan (Marketing & FInance – 2016-18)

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2 comments

  1. Avatar
    Senthil Kumar

    The sudden surge in data centers makes you realize why data is now worshiped globally. Data privacy and security are ends of a dual-edged sword, either ways, it can dismantle/dismember a society. What we need is a right, justifiable balance of both so as to ensure your secret stays a secret unless it is malicious. I would support for a filtered encryption concept for data security.

    • Avatar
      Kshitij Roshan

      True But technology companies are to create a digital key that could open any encrypted smartphone or other locked devices to obtain information and personal data. Their point is to divide the key into pieces so that no one person or agency alone could decide to use it. This method would spread the responsibility (and risk) over multiple parties. But I think built-in back door will turn data repositories into honeypots for hackers.
      No one argues the threats are real, but is there a reasonable compromise that will meet the needs of both individual citizens and those sworn to protect them?

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